Women in Chad face a lifetime risk between 1 in 11-14 of dying due to complications arising from child birth12. Conditions have never been good, but the maternal mortality has actually increased in the last decade compared with rates in the mid 90’s3

 

Chad_mother_childCurrently, maternal death rates are approximately 1100 deaths per 100,000 live births4. Younger ages of marriage, increasing fertility rates and difficult economic circumstances all contribute to the exceptionally dangerous conditions for women being children5.

 
Currently 72% of all women are married by the time they are 186. 35% are married at age 14 or younger7. Within one year each of them will bear their first child, 42% before they are even 178. Additional pregnancies will follow quickly. Health professionals estimate that over one quarter of women will be pregnant before their bodies have recovered9. Further complicating maternity in Chad is the level of poverty, the lack of education, the rurality, and the inequality of women. These demographic concerns and cultural practices place women in an extraordinarily difficult circumstance. 
 
A plan to reduce maternal mortality by two-thirds has been forwarded through the government, however little to no progress has yet been observed10 

  1. United States Department of State, Country Report on Human Rights, Accessed: 25 November 2012 
  2. Save the Children 2006 
  3. African Development Bank, Gender Poverty and Economic Indicators on African Countries, Economic and Social Statistics Department: Tunis, Tunisia, 2007 
  4. World Health Organization, World Health Statistics, Part III, Global Health Indicators, Published 2012, Accessed 1 June 2012 
  5. Chad CEDAW, 20, October, 2010, 02, March, 2012) 9, 38, 53 
  6. Population Reference Bureau, The World’s Women and Girls, 2011, 19 October 2012 
  7. Powerful Partners: Adolescent Girls’ Education and Delayed Childbearing 2007 1  
  8. Demographic and Health Surveys, Rapport de synthese 2004 3 
  9. Demographic and Health Surveys, Rapport de synthese 2004 3 
  10. Chad CEDAW, 20, October, 2010, 02, March, 2012 

  1. United States Department of State, Country Report on Human Rights, Accessed: 25 November 2012 

  2. Save the Children 2006 

  3. African Development Bank, Gender Poverty and Economic Indicators on African Countries, Economic and Social Statistics Department: Tunis, Tunisia, 2007 

  4. World Health Organization, World Health Statistics, Part III, Global Health Indicators, Published 2012, Accessed 1 June 2012 

  5. Chad CEDAW, 20, October, 2010, 02, March, 2012) 9, 38, 53 

  6. Population Reference Bureau, The World’s Women and Girls, 2011, 19 October 2012 

  7. Powerful Partners: Adolescent Girls’ Education and Delayed Childbearing 2007 1  

  8. Demographic and Health Surveys, Rapport de synthese 2004 3 

  9. Demographic and Health Surveys, Rapport de synthese 2004 3 

  10. Chad CEDAW, 20, October, 2010, 02, March, 2012